Charles Arnoldi
Karel Apple
David Banks
Herbert Bayer
Hans Bellmer
Billy Al Bengston
Elizabeth Bergreen
Eugene Berman
Oscar Bluemner
Dorothy Brett
Nicholas Brigante
Annie W. Brigmann
Armando Britto
Nanette Calder
Camera Works
Marc Chagall
Robert Cremean
Jose Luis Cuevas
Jim Dine
Gordon Onslow Ford
Sam Francis
Charles Gesmar
Joe Goode
Sidney Gordin
Balcomb Greene
Gertrude Greene
Pier Guzzi
Roy Gussow
F. Benedict Herzog
Hilaire Hiler
David Octavius Hill
Carl Holty
Winslow Homer
John Hunter
Mike Kanemitsu
Gertrude Kasebier
Oskar Kokoschka
Lee Krasner
Robert Longo
Helen Lundeberg
Richard Lytle
John Mancini
Andre Masson
Henry Moore
Lee Mullican
Matt Mullican
Claes Oldenburg
Wolfgang Paalen
Pablo Palazuelo
Mexican Retablos
Jose de Rivera
James Rosenquist
Morgan Russell
Niki de Saint Phalle
Kurt Seligmann
Eduard Steichen
Theophile Alexandre Steinlen
Frank Stella
Alfred Stieglitz
Jack Stuppin
Mark Tobey
George C. Tooker, Jr.
Abraham Walkowitz
Tom Wesselmann
Clarence H. White


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Theophile Alexandre Steinlen
Swiss, 1859-1923

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(b Lausanne, 10 Nov 1859; d Paris, 13 Dec 1923)

French illustrator, printmaker, painter and sculptor, of Swiss birth. After studying at the University at Lausanne and working as an apprentice designer in a textile factory in Mulhouse, Steinlen arrived in Paris in 1881 and quickly established himself in Montmartre, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life. In 1883 the illustrator Adolphe Willette introduced him to the avant-garde literary and artistic environment of the Chat Noir cabaret which had been founded in 1881 by another Swiss expatriot, Rodolphe Salis. Steinlen soon became an illustrator of its satirical and humorous journal, Chat noir, and an artistic collaborator with writers such as Emile Zola, poets such as Jean Richepin, composers such as Paul Delmet, artists such as Toulouse-Lautrec and, most important, the singer and songwriter Aristide Bruant, all of whom he encountered at the Chat Noir. Bruantís lyrics incorporate the argot of the poor, the worker, the rogue, the pimp and the prostitute, for whom Steinlenís empathy had been awakened on reading Zolaís novel LíAssommoir (1877). Steinlen became the principal illustrator for Bruantís journal Le Mirliton (1885≠96) and for the various books containing his songs and monologues, including the two volumes of Dans la rue (1888≠95).
-From The Grove Dictionary of Art